GRM 2010 GRM 2011

Abstract Details

 
AUTHOR NAME
 
Family Name:
ABU DAYYEH
 
First Name:
AYOUB
 
ABSTRACT OF PAPER
 
Title of Paper:
Sustainable Green Buildings: Kamaliyya Residence
 
Paper Proposal Text :
Workshop no: 6
Sustainable Green Buildings: Kamaliyya Residence
Ayoub Abu Dayyeh (PhD)

Workshop no: 6
Sustainable Green Buildings: Kamaliyya Residence
Ayoub Abu-Dayyeh (PhD)
Email: Ayoub101@hotmail.com

Four questions this paper will attempt to answer following a brief introduction of the Kamaliyya Residence that was built in Jordan in 2008 which is under consideration herein as a case study. The introduction is intended to help discover the location of the residence, awards granted and the design team; it will also present an idea on its size, function, pre-construction environmental measures executed and building technology used in a semi-arid climate conditions prevailing in the Middle East.

The first question attempted to answer would be: Why was the Kamaliyya Residence considered as a case study and why it was built in such a manner? Hence attempting to explicate the socio-economic and eco-centric needs for that project which was constructed during the years 2007/2008, as well as to uncover the aims of the project; reflecting on the energy crisis during that particular period, the rising green energy technology availability and the drop in the capital invested, the escalating local environmental concerns after the first environmentally related laws which came into effect in Jordan starting with the EIA law of 2005 and finally looking at the issue within the global perspective of global warming and climate change as a result of rising concentrations of green house gases, partly related to the built environment under consideration.

The second question attempted would be how the Kamaliyya Residence was built? Answering this question will cover a substantial portion of the work in this paper, discussing orientation of structure with respect to the south, passive architectural design in general, local building materials used in the construction, thermal insulation techniques, the innovative solutions applied to reduce air infiltration, introducing solar thermal hollow-tube technology application, photo-voltaic panels for electricity production, grey water management, as well as rain water harvesting techniques.

The third question to attempt answering would be: what is next? And how can the design be improved for future implications on other similar projects? The author will consider re-evaluating the design concept and discussing the possibility of increasing the efficiency of the different techniques used and developed in the past years and hence offer revised experiential opinions based on the previous five years that has passed monitoring the house and living in it. Finally, reflecting on the future aspirations of the design methodology and the possible implications of this experience on the overall building industry in the Middle East in general, and particularly that of the Gulf region.

Answering the fourth question would finally discuss the impact of the built environment on climate change on a global scale and the need to change human anthropocentric behaviors, shedding some light on the transition from eco-conscious synergistic environmental ethics of traditional dwellings in arid and semi-arid climates of the Middle East (Traditional Adobe Dwellings, for example) into modern “eclectic” dwellings imported “as built” from the West. Those dwellings has proved to be alienated from the region`s accumulative experience, climatic conditions, basic needs and culture! We shall then attempt to question why is it difficult to reprioritize our lifestyles, shelter and somatic needs, particularly in the South where it can be the source of potential social and political unrest. To avoid such a dramatic ending, the paper would suggest green practices as a method for creating more green jobs and equity amongst citizens that can consequently be utilized as an incentive to good governance in future green economies.

Kamaliyya Residence
Ayoub Abu-Dayyeh (PhD)

Email: Ayoub101@hotmail.com

Four questions this paper will attempt to answer following a brief introduction of the Kamaliyya Residence that was built in Jordan in 2008 which is under consideration herein as a case study. The introduction is intended to help discover the location of the residence, awards granted and the design team; it will also present an idea on its size, function, pre-construction environmental measures executed and building technology used in a semi-arid climate conditions prevailing in the Middle East.

The first question attempted to answer would be: Why was the Kamaliyya Residence considered as a case study and why it was built in such a manner? Hence attempting to explicate the socio-economic and eco-centric needs for that project which was constructed during the years 2007/2008, as well as to uncover the aims of the project; reflecting on the energy crisis during that particular period, the rising green energy technology availability and the drop in the capital invested, the escalating local environmental concerns after the first environmentally related laws which came into effect in Jordan starting with the EIA law of 2005 and finally looking at the issue within the global perspective of global warming and climate change as a result of rising concentrations of green house gases, partly related to the built environment under consideration.

The second question attempted would be how the Kamaliyya Residence was built? Answering this question will cover a substantial portion of the work in this paper, discussing orientation of structure with respect to the south, passive architectural design in general, local building materials used in the construction, thermal insulation techniques, the innovative solutions applied to reduce air infiltration, introducing solar thermal hollow-tube technology application, photo-voltaic panels for electricity production, grey water management, as well as rain water harvesting techniques.

The third question to attempt answering would be: what is next? And how can the design be improved for future implications on other similar projects? The author will consider re-evaluating the design concept and discussing the possibility of increasing the efficiency of the different techniques used and developed in the past years and hence offer revised experiential opinions based on the previous five years that has passed monitoring the house and living in it. Finally, reflecting on the future aspirations of the design methodology and the possible implications of this experience on the overall building industry in the Middle East in general, and particularly that of the Gulf region.

Answering the fourth question would finally discuss the impact of the built environment on climate change on a global scale and the need to change human anthropocentric behaviors, shedding some light on the transition from eco-conscious synergistic environmental ethics of traditional dwellings in arid and semi-arid climates of the Middle East (Traditional Adobe Dwellings, for example) into modern “eclectic” dwellings imported “as built” from the West. Those dwellings has proved to be alienated from the region`s accumulative experience, climatic conditions, basic needs and culture! We shall then attempt to question why is it difficult to reprioritize our lifestyles, shelter and somatic needs, particularly in the South where it can be the source of potential social and political unrest. To avoid such a dramatic ending, the paper would suggest green practices as a method for creating more green jobs and equity amongst citizens that can consequently be utilized as an incentive to good governance in future green economies.


Email: Ayoub101@hotmail.com

Four questions this paper will attempt to answer following a brief introduction of the Kamaliyya Residence that was built in Jordan in 2008 which is under consideration herein as a case study. The introduction is intended to help discover the location of the residence, awards granted and the design team; it will also present an idea on its size, function, pre-construction environmental measures executed and building technology used in a semi-arid climate conditions prevailing in the Middle East.

The first question attempted to answer would be: Why was the Kamaliyya Residence considered as a case study and why it was built in such a manner? Hence attempting to explicate the socio-economic and eco-centric needs for that project which was constructed during the years 2007/2008, as well as to uncover the aims of the project; reflecting on the energy crisis during that particular period, the rising green energy technology availability and the drop in the capital invested, the escalating local environmental concerns after the first environmentally related laws which came into effect in Jordan starting with the EIA law of 2005 and finally looking at the issue within the global perspective of global warming and climate change as a result of rising concentrations of green house gases, partly related to the built environment under consideration.

The second question attempted would be how the Kamaliyya Residence was built? Answering this question will cover a substantial portion of the work in this paper, discussing orientation of structure with respect to the south, passive architectural design in general, local building materials used in the construction, thermal insulation techniques, the innovative solutions applied to reduce air infiltration, introducing solar thermal hollow-tube technology application, photo-voltaic panels for electricity production, grey water management, as well as rain water harvesting techniques.

The third question to attempt answering would be: what is next? And how can the design be improved for future implications on other similar projects? The author will consider re-evaluating the design concept and discussing the possibility of increasing the efficiency of the different techniques used and developed in the past years and hence offer revised experiential opinions based on the previous five years that has passed monitoring the house and living in it. Finally, reflecting on the future aspirations of the design methodology and the possible implications of this experience on the overall building industry in the Middle East in general, and particularly that of the Gulf region.

Answering the fourth question would finally discuss the impact of the built environment on climate change on a global scale and the need to change human anthropocentric behaviors, shedding some light on the transition from eco-conscious synergistic environmental ethics of traditional dwellings in arid and semi-arid climates of the Middle East (Traditional Adobe Dwellings, for example) into modern “eclectic” dwellings imported “as built” from the West. Those dwellings has proved to be alienated from the region`s accumulative experience, climatic conditions, basic needs and culture! We shall then attempt to question why is it difficult to reprioritize our lifestyles, shelter and somatic needs, particularly in the South where it can be the source of potential social and political unrest. To avoid such a dramatic ending, the paper would suggest green practices as a method for creating more green jobs and equity amongst citizens that can consequently be utilized as an incentive to good governance in future green economies.



Four questions this paper will attempt to answer following a brief introduction of the Kamaliyya Residence that was built in Jordan in 2008 which is under consideration herein as a case study. The introduction is intended to help discover the location of the residence, awards granted and the design team; it will also present an idea on its size, function, pre-construction environmental measures executed and building technology used in a semi-arid climate conditions prevailing in the Middle East.

The first question attempted to answer would be: Why was the Kamaliyya Residence considered as a case study and why it was built in such a manner? Hence attempting to explicate the socio-economic and eco-centric needs for that project which was constructed during the years 2007/2008, as well as to uncover the aims of the project; reflecting on the energy crisis during that particular period, the rising green energy technology availability and the drop in the capital invested, the escalating local environmental concerns after the first environmentally related laws which came into effect in Jordan starting with the EIA law of 2005 and finally looking at the issue within the global perspective of global warming and climate change as a result of rising concentrations of green house gases, partly related to the built environment under consideration.

The second question attempted would be how the Kamaliyya Residence was built? Answering this question will cover a substantial portion of the work in this paper, discussing orientation of structure with respect to the south, passive architectural design in general, local building materials used in the construction, thermal insulation techniques, the innovative solutions applied to reduce air infiltration, introducing solar thermal hollow-tube technology application, photo-voltaic panels for electricity production, grey water management, as well as rain water harvesting techniques.

The third question to attempt answering would be: what is next? And how can the design be improved for future implications on other similar projects? The author will consider re-evaluating the design concept and discussing the possibility of increasing the efficiency of the different techniques used and developed in the past years and hence offer revised experiential opinions based on the previous five years that has passed monitoring the house and living in it. Finally, reflecting on the future aspirations of the design methodology and the possible implications of this experience on the overall building industry in the Middle East in general, and particularly that of the Gulf region.

Answering the fourth question would finally discuss the impact of the built environment on climate change on a global scale and the need to change human anthropocentric behaviors, shedding some light on the transition from eco-conscious synergistic environmental ethics of traditional dwellings in arid and semi-arid climates of the Middle East (Traditional Adobe Dwellings, for example) into modern “eclectic” dwellings imported “as built” from the West. Those dwellings has proved to be alienated from the region`s accumulative experience, climatic conditions, basic needs and culture! We shall then attempt to question why is it difficult to reprioritize our lifestyles, shelter and somatic needs, particularly in the South where it can be the source of potential social and political unrest. To avoid such a dramatic ending, the paper would suggest green practices as a method for creating more green jobs and equity amongst citizens that can consequently be utilized as an incentive to good governance in future green economies.
 
 
 

WITH THE GENEROUS SUPPORT OF